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Subpoena or Notice to Produce – how to get the documents you need!

By Hayley Hitch, an Associate of Matthews Folbigg, in our Insolvency, Restructuring and Debt Recovery Group.

Have you ever wondered about the difference between a subpoena and a notice to produce? These can be confusing and sometimes cause delays in proceedings or result in significant additional legal costs.

Both a subpoena and a notice to produce are court forms used once proceedings have been commenced, to obtain documentation from a specific individual or entity. A subpoena can also be issued to require a witness to attend Court and give evidence at a hearing.

In simple terms, a subpoena is issued by the Court to request documents from someone who is not a party to the proceedings. On the other hand, a notice to produce is issued by a party to the proceedings to request documents from another party.

Subpoena

Most courts have rules about how to obtain a subpoena. Under the Uniform Civil Procedure Rules 2005 (NSW) (“the Rules”) for instance, the Court will issue a subpoena if requested by a party. However, if that party is not represented by a solicitor, leave of the court is required (Rule 7.3).
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Separation Lawyer on Gaining Sole Use and Occupancy of the Family Holiday Home

The power of the Court to make an order for sole use and occupancy derives from s 114 of the Family Law Act. A separation lawyer can assist you to put forward or defend this application that would allow a party to live in the property to the exclusion of the other party.

In the case of Belcher & Gardener [2019] FamCA 205 (5 April 2019) the husband brought an application for sole use and occupancy for the holiday home (“the holiday house”) that was registered in the wife’s sole name.

The husband and wife were married for 24 years when they separated in July 2018. The parties had four children, two of whom remain living with the wife in the former matrimonial home. The husband vacated the former matrimonial home and was renting a one-bedroom apartment with his cousin.

The separation lawyer for the wife estimated that the total property pool of the parties was in the vicinity of $20 million. The holiday house had an estimated value of $3.5million. While the wife  was currently unemployed, the husband was a director of a consultancy company. The wife estimated the husband’s earnings to be about $750,000 per annum. Notwithstanding it was his application, the husband did not reveal the sources of his income or assets and therefore his version of events was incomplete.

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Unjust Child Support Assessments: A Child Support Lawyers Guide

The Child Support Assessment Act allows the Registrar to change a child support assessment if the assessment of child support results in an unjust and inequitable level of financial support being paid. Child support lawyers can challenge a child support assessment on limited and specified grounds which can include:

  1. The circumstances of either parent’s income, property or  financial resources
  2. The earning capacity of either parent
  3. The costs of contact for either parent
  4. The expenses of the child or children including in some circumstances their education expenses

Some of these grounds are considered below.

1. Income, Property and Financial Resources

A common issue concerning the income, property and financial resources of a parent is when the income of one parent is significantly higher or lower than the amount recorded in the actual assessment.

There can be all sorts of reasons why the tax return and or notice of assessment does not reflect the actual income of the parent.

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Property Settlement Agreement – Can the Court Split Employment Bonuses?

What is Property?

When negotiating a property settlement agreement, one of the first steps to be considered is what property you and your former spouse have or own. This step is important as only property can be subject to a property settlement agreement. The Family Law Act defines property as “any property in the possession of either party, either vested or in remainder.”  Property of the relationship generally includes:

  • All assets that are owned, g. the family home, motor vehicles, personal items
  • All assets under your control, e.g. a business, superannuation, shares and funds at bank
  • All liabilities, e.g. mortgages, credit cards, hire purchase agreements

Are Employment Bonuses Property?

In the case of Ilannello & Ilannello (No 3) [2018] FCCA 3752 (19 December 2018) the Court considered the question of whether the wife’s future employment bonus payments could be the subject of a property order.

Facts of the Case

In this case, the husband had suffered a workplace accident and had been unemployed since 2013. The husband was living on a permanent disability payment from his super fund. While he owned about $78,000 in shares, he claimed that his legal fees were equally as much. On the other hand, his wife had a base salary of $190,000 per year plus employment bonuses. In the previous year, the wife received $54,000 in bonuses.

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Mediation and Your Family Law Dispute

Mediation and Your Family Law Dispute – Agreements that Suit Your Needs

WHAT IS MEDIATION?

Mediation is an alternative way to determine a family law dispute outside of the courts. The Mediator Standards Board defines mediation as: “a process in which the participants, with the support of the mediator, identify issues, develop options, consider alternatives and make decisions about future actions and outcomes.”

It is a process of problem-solving that is guided by an impartial third party called a mediator.

WHAT DOES A MEDIATOR DO?

In family law, the role of the mediator is to facilitate the process of dispute and conflict resolution while the content of the discussions rests with the parties. The mediator can assist the parties to clarify the most pertinent issues and consider ways to resolve these issues. A mediator will not, and cannot, give advice about your dispute or determine the dispute for you.

HOW IS MEDIATION DIFFERENT FROM COUNSELLING, CONCILIATION OR ARBITRATION

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Judicial Mediation: A New Option To Resolve Your Dispute

As of 1 January 2019, parties to a family law dispute and their marriage lawyer, in appropriate cases, may now have the option of Judicial Mediation in the Federal Circuit Court of Australia. Judicial Mediation is not intended to replace or substitute private mediation. Rather, the court expects that parties to a family law dispute exhaust all mediation alternatives, such as private mediation with a private mediator, prior to Judicial Mediation.

The Judicial Mediator

The Judicial Mediator may not be the Judge that would ordinarily determine the family law dispute. This Judge is referred to as the Docket Judge. Where both Judges consent, the Docket Judge may refer the proceeding for Judicial Mediation to another Judge.

How to Initiate Judicial Mediation

Judicial Mediation can be initiated in two ways. Firstly, you or your marriage lawyer can make an oral application in court. Alternatively, you or your marriage lawyer may apply for judicial mediation in writing to the Docket Judge. The written application must include a brief summary in bullet point format addressing why the matter is suitable for Judicial Mediation.

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Tougher Penalties under the Australian Consumer Law

The Treasury Laws Amendment (2018 Measures No. 3) Act 2018 (Cth) has introduced new tougher penalties for companies and individuals who breach certain provisions of the Australian Consumer Law (ACL).

What are the new penalties for companies?

The new maximum penalty for companies is the greater of:

  • $10 million; or
  • 3 times the value of the benefit directly or indirectly obtained by the company (and any related companies) which is reasonably attributable to the offence; or
  • if the value of the benefit cannot be determined, 10% of the annual turnover of the company (and any related companies) for the 12 month period leading up to the commission of the offence.

Previously, the maximum penalty for companies was $1.1 million.

What are the new penalties for individuals?

The new maximum penalty for individuals is $500,000 (up from the previous maximum of $220,000).

Multiple Penalties

The maximum penalties will apply to each contravention, so companies and individuals could potentially face massive fines if they commit multiple contraventions of the ACL.
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Directors: Beware of relying on the advice of others!

In the exercise of their duties, company directors often rely on both internal and external sources of advice.  However, directors may be liable if their reliance on the advice of others is “unreasonable”.

What does the Corporations Act say?

Section 189 of the Corporations Act states that a director may rely on information, or professional or expert advice, given or prepared by:

  • an employee of the company whom the director believes on reasonable grounds to be reliable and competent in relation to the matters concerned
  • a professional adviser or expert in relation to matters that the director believes on reasonable grounds to be within the person’s professional or expert competence
  • another director or officer in relation to matters within the director’s or officer’s authority
  • a committee of directors on which the director did not serve in relation to matters within the committee’s authority

provided that:

  • the reliance was made in good faith and after making an independent assessment of the information or advice, having regard to the director’s knowledge of the company and the complexity of the structure and operations of the company
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